Urhobo Historical Society

URHOBO VERSUS HERBERT MACAULAY
IN LEGAL TUSSLE IN LAGOS COURT
(1940s-1950s)


In the 1940s and 1950s, Urhobos were a small minority in the affairs of Lagos, the political and commercial capital of colonial Nigeria. Unlike their significant presence in Lagos in modern times, Urhobos in Lagos were neither a favoured nor a significant group in the 1940s. In contrast, the most powerful African in the affairs of Lagos in the forties was Herbert Macaulay, a prominent and wealthy civil engineer, who became the founding President of the National Council of Nigeria and Cameroons. For reasons that were not clear to most Urhobos in the forties, Macaulay dragged Urhobos to British colonial courts in Lagos. Urhobos won a resounding victory, resulting in the following popular folk song in the 1940s and 1950s in which the Urhobo expressed their pride in winning a victory over the Great Herbert Macaulay.

Peter P. Ekeh
Editor@waado.org
31 December, 2001


Urhobo Text [From Chief Daniel Obiomah]

Urhobo ve Macaulay gu' edjo
Urhobo ri' ase (2ce)
Ajuwa e - e - e -
Urhobo ri' ase,
Ajuwa - e - e - e
Urhobo ri' ase.

 

Translation By Peter P. Ekeh

Urhobo went to Court
With the Great Herbert Macaulay
Urhobo worsted Macaulay in law
Urhobo won in law!
Oh! What a glorious victory
Urhobo won in law!
Oh! What a glorious victory
Urhobo won in law!


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